124 Guests, 0 Users

Author Topic: Grass  (Read 420 times)  Share 

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline zelmo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 283
  • River Rat
Grass
« on: August 24, 2020, 11:16:55 PM »
Is anyone else seeing different grass growth this year?

The section of the river that I fish the most has areas completely matted over that had very little grass in prior years. Other spots that usually have a lot of grass are devoid. 

I donít have historical records of the HBG gauge but it doesnít seem to have been much different this year than last year.  Could water level be the answer?

Susquehanna River Fishing Forum

Grass
« on: August 24, 2020, 11:16:55 PM »

Offline Pawatch

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 91
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2020, 10:42:03 AM »
Is anyone else seeing different grass growth this year?

The section of the river that I fish the most has areas completely matted over that had very little grass in prior years. Other spots that usually have a lot of grass are devoid. 

I donít have historical records of the HBG gauge but it doesnít seem to have been much different this year than last year.  Could water level be the answer?

If you go to HBG  gauge page, somewhere on that page there should some information about that stuff.

Yeah this is a bad year for weeds. At least up this way.
Fish on...

Offline DRY

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 867
  • Catch, Photograph and Release
Re: Grass
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2020, 11:16:52 AM »
Excessive sediment on rocks and shorelines makes a good seed bed for grass
Excessive nitrogen and phosphorous from sewage, lawns and farm run-off makes good fertilizer
Both the grass and associated algae make oxygen during the day but consume oxygen at night much faster during respiration

I did dissolved oxygen concentrations on a local lake one summer that was matted with grass and algae
I did the testing because tadpoles and frogs had disappeared and fishing had declined
Pre-sunrise dissolved oxygen levels were nihl (zero) most places on the lake
Not good for living organisms
Just another problem for the mighty Susquehanna

Bill
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 11:20:42 AM by DRY »
The hours spent fishing are not subtracted from the lives of men!!

Offline zelmo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 283
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2020, 12:33:22 PM »
Bill, I understand all of that but it doesnít explain why an area that never had a problem is matted while an area a half mile away that used to be heavy now has very little. 

I am talking about one side of the river to the next.  Where the grass is heavy the water is usually clearer than the other location.  Maybe it is just more sunlight getting to the grass sooner. 

Susquehanna River Fishing Forum

Re: Grass
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2020, 12:33:22 PM »

Offline Phil Sweeney

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 362
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2020, 09:21:03 AM »
Is anyone else seeing different grass growth this year?

The section of the river that I fish the most has areas completely matted over that had very little grass in prior years. Other spots that usually have a lot of grass are devoid. 

I donít have historical records of the HBG gauge but it doesnít seem to have been much different this year than last year.  Could water level be the answer?
At Muddy Creek I do not see much difference. Starting to see a lot floating down river which is typical this time of year. I always look forward to when its gone, I do not fish grass and prefer rocky and flow areas. I say grass but I cannot ID different varieties. I generally avoid it as I do not see shad swimming out of it. Maybe I am missing something. At Raystown however I look for what I believe is coontail and have done well fishing that. That seems to move or disappear i.e., always changing. I have heard rumors Corp of Engineers tries to control it.
Phil

Offline stonecat

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 36
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2020, 11:05:44 AM »
Excessive sediment on rocks and shorelines makes a good seed bed for grass
Excessive nitrogen and phosphorous from sewage, lawns and farm run-off makes good fertilizer
Both the grass and associated algae make oxygen during the day but consume oxygen at night much faster during respiration

I did dissolved oxygen concentrations on a local lake one summer that was matted with grass and algae
I did the testing because tadpoles and frogs had disappeared and fishing had declined
Pre-sunrise dissolved oxygen levels were nihl (zero) most places on the lake
Not good for living organisms
Just another problem for the mighty Susquehanna

Bill
Don't quite get how all this comes together but this is interesting:
« Last Edit: September 07, 2020, 11:15:24 AM by stonecat »

Offline DRY

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 867
  • Catch, Photograph and Release
Re: Grass
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2020, 12:47:57 PM »
Don't quite get how all this comes together but this is interesting:
There is a balance to be met in any aquatic ecosystem.
Too much aquatic plant growth ultimately will result in a reduced dissolved oxygen content of the water body, eventually suffocating fish and other aquatic species.

Bill
The hours spent fishing are not subtracted from the lives of men!!

Offline stonecat

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 36
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2020, 07:13:21 PM »
There is a balance to be met in any aquatic ecosystem.
Too much aquatic plant growth ultimately will result in a reduced dissolved oxygen content of the water body, eventually suffocating fish and other aquatic species.

Bill
   
  Most ponds/ lakes in this area seem to have weed problems.That includes some that are not in ag. or developed areas .Almost hard to imagine the need to use fertilizer.

Susquehanna River Fishing Forum

Re: Grass
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2020, 07:13:21 PM »

Offline zelmo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 283
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2020, 10:12:28 AM »
There is a balance to be met in any aquatic ecosystem.
Too much aquatic plant growth ultimately will result in a reduced dissolved oxygen content of the water body, eventually suffocating fish and other aquatic species.

Bill

?

Aquatic plants are no different than other green plants.  They photosynthesize.  Photosynthesis is the process by which green plants and certain other organisms transform light energy into chemical energy. During photosynthesis in green plants, light energy is captured and used to convert water, carbon dioxide, and minerals into oxygen and energy-rich organic compounds.

I used to have a heavily planted aquarium.  The system used VHO fluorescent tubes for the light source and I pumped about 5 lbs of CO2 into the tank per week.  You could actually see the oxygen bubbling off the plants.  The fish loved it.

« Last Edit: September 11, 2020, 10:14:23 AM by zelmo »

Offline DRY

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 867
  • Catch, Photograph and Release
Re: Grass
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2020, 11:29:37 AM »
?

Aquatic plants are no different than other green plants.  They photosynthesize.  Photosynthesis is the process by which green plants and certain other organisms transform light energy into chemical energy. During photosynthesis in green plants, light energy is captured and used to convert water, carbon dioxide, and minerals into oxygen and energy-rich organic compounds.

I used to have a heavily planted aquarium.  The system used VHO fluorescent tubes for the light source and I pumped about 5 lbs of CO2 into the tank per week.  You could actually see the oxygen bubbling off the plants.  The fish loved it.

Correct - photosynthesis produces oxygen and uses carbon dioxide

But in the dark (turn the lights off; during night hours) plants use oxygen (called respiration) to continue living in the dark and they produce carbon dioxide

Not good in an ecosystem that has too much grass or a heavy algae presence in the water...it lowers nighttime oxygen levels to unacceptable levels

Bill
The hours spent fishing are not subtracted from the lives of men!!

Offline zelmo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 283
  • River Rat
Re: Grass
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2020, 12:46:45 PM »
Actually cellular respiration occurs all the time, not just when it is dark. When there is a good amount of light the photosynthesis creates much more oxygen than the plant uses. In a natural environment in our geographic area the longest days of the summer are when the aquatic growth is at its peak. 

Yes it is a complex equation that needs balance. Added ďnutrientsĒ in the water will stimulate plant growth.  The amount of light has much to do with determining if that is algae or grass.  If we had a prolonged period of cloud cover you would see decreases in oxygen but that is not the norm. 

Offline DRY

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 867
  • Catch, Photograph and Release
Re: Grass
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2020, 03:46:23 PM »
... If we had a prolonged period of cloud cover you would see decreases in oxygen but that is not the norm.

For many years one of the problems adding to smallmouth bass mortality in the Susquehanna was reported to be low oxygen saturation levels in the parts of the river where smallmouth spawn and YOY grow up...

See pages 32 and 33 of this link...
https://www.fishandboat.com/Fish/Fisheries/SusquehannaRiverManagement/Documents/susqImpairment/arway2011leg-brief.pdf

My own observations in an overgrown, weedy lake showed that nighttime levels of oxygen fell to intolerable levels for living organisms...7-8 hours of dark is enough to lower oxygen below acceptable levels.

Bill

The hours spent fishing are not subtracted from the lives of men!!

Susquehanna River Fishing Forum

Re: Grass
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2020, 03:46:23 PM »

 

SuskyFishers-Bottom

Advertise @ SuskyFishers.com
Copyright 2018 SuskyFishers.com